Microsoft bringing Windows 10 S Mode to All Editions, Switching Out Of...

Microsoft bringing Windows 10 S Mode to All Editions, Switching Out Of It Will Be Free


Microsoft confirms Windows 10’s S mode is coming, can be switched for free

Joe Belfiore, Microsoft Corporate Vice President, has officially confirmed on Twitter that Windows 10 in S Mode will be rolled out to all editions of Windows 10 next year. “Next year 10 S will be a ‘mode’ of existing versions, not a distinct version,” says Belfiore.

The new S mode will restrict any copy of Windows 10 and only run certain apps from the Microsoft Store. It will continue to work the same way as the dedicated Windows “10 S” OS was developed to do.

“We hope this new approach will simplify and make it possible for more customers to start using Windows in S mode: a familiar, productive Windows experience that is streamlined for security and performance across all our editions.”

In a detailed blog post, Microsoft explained that the separation between 10 and 10 S would be removed, and that Windows 10 S wouldn’t continue in its current form of a separate version of the OS. Windows “10 S” – the latest version of its flagship OS – was released in mid-2017 with an aim to provide a Windows experience that delivers predictable performance and quality through Microsoft-verified apps via the Microsoft Store.

The next big feature update to Windows 10 is likely to be the Redstone 4 update around April. Microsoft is contemplating a new “S Mode” for Windows 10 Home, Enterprise, and Pro versions of the OS.

Belfiore said, “We are simplifying the experience for our customers. Starting with the next update to Windows 10, coming soon, customers can choose to buy a new Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro PC with ‘S’ mode enabled and commercial customers will be able to deploy Windows 10 Enterprise with ‘S’ mode enabled.”

The switch to any version of Windows 10 out of S Mode will be free of cost. “If a customer does want to switch out of it, they will be able to do so at no charge, regardless of edition,” the blog post added.

Source: Windows Blogs, Inquirer